It’s Hotter Than Georgia Asphalt-Avoid Heat-Related Illnesses

Now that summer has arrived, we are spending more time outside, at the pool, city parks, and sports fields.  Hot weather can affect us before we know it.  When the temperature rises too much, you cannot sweat enough to stay cool.  High temperatures and high humidity increase your chance of getting heat exhaustion and heat stroke.  Your risk is highest if the heat index is more than 90°F.

When your body starts to overheat, you will get heat exhaustion.

You will notice:

  • More sweating
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Weakness
  • Nausea
  • Headaches
  • Your heart starts beating too fast
When this happens you should:
  • Get into the shade or an air-conditioned building
  • Drink water or other cool liquids
  • Avoid alcohol or soda
  • Take a cool shower or bath.  If you cannot do that, put cool water on your skin.

If you do not feel better in half an hour, contact your doctor or go to the ER.

If you. are not able to cool off and your body gets hotter, you can get heat stroke.

You can get:

  • A fever of 104°F or higher
  • Severe headache
  • Dizziness
  • Flushed or reddened skin
  • Muscle cramps
  • Weakness
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Fast heart beat and fast breathing
  • Confusion and anxiety

If you think you or someone you know has heat stroke, call 911.  Get to a cool place as soon as possible.  Putting ice packs in the arm pits, groin, neck, and back can help.

To prevent heat-related illnesses:

  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.
  • Protect yourself from the sun with a hat or umbrella.
  • Use sunscreen with a SPF of 15 or more.
  • Drink plenty of water. Start before you go out and keep drinking while you are outside.
  • Minimize sodas, tea, coffee, and alcohol.
  • Avoid doing hard work or exercise between 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
  • During an outdoor activity, take frequent breaks.

For more information , check out FamilyDoctor.org at http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/prevention-wellness/staying-healthy/first-aid/heat-exhaustion-an-heatstroke.htm

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